No more Greyhound….

Subject: An Important Update from Greyhound

See how the changes may impact you

WHAT’S
NEW Greyhound Canada Update

We have made the difficult decision to make substantial changes to our service in Canada effective October 31, 2018.

In Quebec, we are able to continue the routes and services we currently offer today.

We are permanently cancelling all Greyhound Canada services in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

In British Columbia, we are cancelling all services as well. However, Greyhound US and BoltBus will continue to offer 4 daily trips each between Vancouver, BC and Seattle.

In Ontario, the majority of the routes will continue to operate. Here is a list of cities where Ontario services have been canceled.

We will maintain a full schedule through October with the last trips departing from affected stations on October 31, 2018.

For customers who purchased tickets online or via our call center, we are automatically refunding tickets for canceled trips. Customers who purchased their tickets through other channels may call us at 1-877-463-6446 and our customer care team will process a refund. Additional details are available here.

This has been a difficult decision for us, but we’ve seen ridership drop consistently since 2010 and continuing service on the affected routes has become unsustainable.

We sincerely appreciate your business over the years. It’s been a pleasure serving you.

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Wildfire & Climate Change conference notes.

From Director Watson:

This week I attended the Wildfire & Climate Change conference in Nelson. The Kaslo and District Community Forest  sums it up well – (see bottom of this post), but  I will add two outcomes from my perspective:

First- we recognize that the historical way of managing forests has caused a ripe environment for massive fires. This conference brought to my attention that we do need to manage our forests, how is the debate. As in farming, mono-cropping and reducing diversity are two of the primary culprits in our current situation. Managing forests into the future needs to focus on integrating biological diversity with various forms of fuel breaks, akin to taking a permaculture approach to forest management. While forest management is not a local government service, understanding how to reduce the risk from a Wildfire and Emergency Services perspective is essential in how we design fuel prescriptions.

Second- Area D has several high priority areas I will be focusing on, Argenta/Johnsons Landing being one. I was grateful to see several community champions from these communities in the audience, engaging and planning. Fuel prescriptions that have recieved successful funding for the upcoming season are:
Woodbury
Howser
Glacier Creek
Kaslo Back Road and
Kaslo Airport area
I will be providing funding to support these projects. Each one will include community consultation in the near future.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST!!
Fire Smart starts at home- then the community- then the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI)- then the landscape level.

The RDCK has 8 Wildfire Mitigation specialists this year that you can call on to assess your home and will assist all communities that would like to acquire Fire Smart status. As an added bonus- I will award a $1350 grant to each community that does attain Fire Smart status. In Area D, we have Woodbury Village and the BackRoad community who have been successful so far. In the cue: Lardeau and Loki Lots!

To request a residential Fire Smart assessment OR as a community champion that would like to inquire about the community recognition program, please call or email:
firesmart@rdck.bc.ca
250-352-1539

 

From Kaslo and District Community Forest: Summary of Wildfire conference

The sold out Nelson Wildfire and Climate Change Conference is underway with close to an even attendance of field professionals and community. Attention is highly focused on the packed schedule of expert speakers invited from Canada to New Mexico, but the days maintain a great flow thanks to the many skilled local volunteers and hosts. While management of carbon balance remains a complex topic, the urgent message that we need to restore an ecosystem managed by controlled, landscape level fire events is a message understood by all.

We heard that forest fuel accumulations have reached critical levels due to years of fire supression and that climate extremes are expected to become the new norm, precipitating frequent ingitions. Over the course of the past 2 days the hushed audience listened to several personal and heartfelt accounts of presenters and guests personally affected by catastrophic events of the 2017 wildfires. It was apparent that no one was prepared for the scale of trauma these events bring along.

We will bring messages heard at the conference to our community meeting on July 12 and have invited John Cathro to give an update to the Community Wildfire Protection Plan [CWPP] as well.